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Campus Safety Report

Safety Awareness

The NASSAU COMMUNITY COLLEGE Public Safety Department is here to ensure that everyone’s experience on campus is a safe and secure one. In order to help you enjoy your educational experience here on campus, we have prepared this information. Please take the time to read it thoroughly and familiarize yourself with it, and refer back to it as necessary.

Your campus Public Safety Department is dedicated to facilitating the educational process and assuring the safety and well-being of the entire College community.

A staff of officers provides 24 hour motorized and foot patrols in and around campus buildings, and prompt response to requests for assistance ranging from reports of possible criminal activity to aiding motorists, vehicle accidents, emergencies and possible safety hazards. Scooter patrols have been added in order to place our officers in closer contact with the public they serve. The staff are trained and licensed by New York State in accordance with the Security Guard Act of 1992. While our officers are not police or peace officers, they do have the authority as granted by the Nassau County Legislature to issue parking summonses and appearance tickets under Nassau County Ordinances 372, 482, Ordinance 238-1984 and Local Law 6.

The provisions of the New York State Education Law also govern behavior on College grounds. For the safety of the College community, Public Safety Officers have the right under this law to request any person on the campus grounds to produce identification. The cooperation of the College populace in this regard adds to everyone’s safety.

A firm working relationship and mutual cooperation between the Nassau County Police and Public Safety ensures that all campus law enforcement needs are satisfied.

Although we have constructed barriers to deter “through” traffic, our open campus is easily accessible to all who wish to enter by vehicle or foot. Because of this open accessibility, all students, faculty and staff are encouraged to exercise a sense of personal responsibility for their own safety and well-being and the safety and well-being of others.

Obey all speed limits, traffic signs, parking regulations and the directives of Public Safety Officers in performance of their duties. If you observe a suspicious person or activity, contact Public Safety immediately for quick response and appropriate action. Our contact number is 516-572-7100. In an emergency, you can reach us on your cell phone at 516-572-7111; from a campus phone just dial 711.

Each member of the College community should consider himself or herself as an active “College Watch” participant. Working together, we can create and maintain a safe environment. Incidents observed by Public Safety patrols are reported by radio and responded to immediately. Students and staff members observing any type of incident should immediately notify a patrol unit if in sight, or call Public Safety for assistance. To facilitate the reporting of emergencies or incidents on campus, the College has installed over 100 special emergency telephones inside and outside of the buildings and in the parking fields. They provide a direct line to Public Safety and will be answered by an officer. If using a regular campus telephone, dial extension 711 in case of emergency. The Public Safety number is prominently displayed on all marked patrol vehicles, in the College directory and on posters throughout the campus to serve as a constant reminder and reinforcement. Whenever you see it displayed make a mental note so you’ll remember it in an emergency, or you can program the number into your cell phone for easy access. Many improvements in lighting on the campus have been made, and escorts are available from the Public Safety Office if the necessity arises. Students and staff members are advised to use the “buddy system” when going to or leaving classes.

It is important for you to remember that we are all a part of the same community. Never turn a blind eye to the problems happening to others around you. Your cooperative efforts to make Nassau Community College a safe environment can have a dynamic impact. We’re all in this together.

Bystanders play a critical role in the prevention of sexual and relationship violence. They are often the largest group of people involved - outnumbering both the perpetrators and the victims. Bystanders can have a range of involvement in assaults. A person or persons may be aware that a specific assault is happening or will happen, they may see an assault or potential assault in progress, or they may have knowledge that an assault has already occurred. Regardless of how close to the incident they are, bystanders have the power stop assaults and to get help for people who have been victimized.

Being an active bystander does not require that we risk our own safety or the well-being of others. Our goal is to aid in the prevention of violence without causing further threat, harm, or damage. Remember, there is a range of actions that are appropriate, depending on the situation. If you or someone else is in immediate danger, calling for Public Safety or the police is the best action a bystander can take. Watch out for your friends and fellow community members– if you see someone who looks like they are in trouble, ask if they are okay. If you see a friend doing something wrong, say something. 

The Physical Plant maintains the campus buildings and facilities with a concern for safety and security. The Public Safety Department and Physical Plant personnel regularly inspect the campus to ensure that safety hazards are remedied in a timely fashion, and to ensure locks, windows, and fire safety equipment operate properly. If you see something that you think is a problem, say something.

Safety and personal well-being is a shared responsibility. There are some important things you can do to protect yourself and those around you.

  • BE AWARE OF YOUR SURROUNDINGS. Be sure to know who and what is around you. The best way you can protect yourself is to be and appear to be aware of everything around you. People who appear to be self-assured and have an assertive “body language” are less likely to be victimized.
  • PROTECT YOUR BELONGINGS. Put your name on your books and other personal property. Thieves are less likely to take well-marked items, and if they are lost or stolen, the likelihood of recovery is greatly increased if you have your name on your property.
  • LOCK YOUR VEHICLE. Make sure nothing of value is left in sight from outside the vehicle.
  • DON’T LEAVE ITEMS UNATTENDED. A minute is all it takes for someone to walk away with your books, or purse or any other item. It is not advisable to leave your property unattended anywhere, whether in a classroom, a food services area, or on a bench. You are not at home. Don’t put yourself in a position to become a victim.
  • TRUST YOUR INSTINCTS. When you feel uneasy around certain people or situations there is usually a good reason for it. Trust your 6th sense, and report your apprehensions immediately to Public Safety.
  • REPORT SUSPICIOUS ACTIVITY. Problems are easier to solve if they are caught right away. Together, we can make Nassau Community College a safer place to be.

All reports and complaints are treated seriously. If Public Safety is notified of a safety hazard, an officer will respond to the location, assess the situation, and take immediate action to prevent injury and /or property damage.

If a report of a medical emergency is received, Public Safety will respond directly, and after assessing the situation, ensure the appropriate medical personnel respond to the situation. Members of the Public Safety Department receive first aid training and several members of the Department are certified by NYS as EMTs and can render assistance prior to the arrival of an ambulance.

In the case of vehicle accidents, Public Safety will respond, safeguard the accident site, gather the information necessary for the appropriate report, and will ensure that whatever other assistance is needed whether that be from the police, fire department, or ambulance also responds to the scene.

In the case of reports of any criminal activity, the Public Safety Department will assist victims and witnesses in making reports with the Nassau County Police. Public Safety in many cases will perform the initial investigation and then assist the police in whatever way they deem is appropriate. In some cases, incidents involving alleged violations of the Student Code of Conduct are referred to the Dean of Students for possible discipline. In all cases involving violence, bodily harm, or other incidents of a serious nature, Public Safety will report the incident to the Nassau County Police. Public Safety will also assist and facilitate the report of such events to the police by the people directly involved if the victims and or witnesses wish to contact the police directly.

Dean of Student’s Office: 516-572-7376
Nassau Community College Public Safety Department: 516-572-7100
Nassau Community College Public Safety Emergency contact number: 711 from a campus telephone. From a cell phone 516-572-7111.
Police Emergency: 911
Nassau County Police Department Third Precinct: 516-573-6300

In the event that a serious crime occurs on campus that may impact the safety of the College community, Public Safety will issue a Public Safety alert via e-mail and signs will be posted at the entrances to all buildings. This is to ensure that members of the College community are aware that a situation occurred and to enable them to take appropriate actions to protect themselves. Where a reported threat is of an immediate nature, Public Safety will send alerts out via NCC Alert through the Campus Rave system.

The College Public Safety Department is here to assist you. It is a responsibility that is taken very seriously by all members of the Department.

The Director of Public Safety regularly publishes information concerning good safety habits and procedures, displays seasonably appropriate safety and public service posters throughout the campus and provides information describing Public Safety Services. In addition, the Director regularly provides information to the Vignette (the College newspaper) regarding safety policies and procedures, individual responsibilities, and items of current concern on campus.

Students and staff members are urged to utilize these Public Safety publications as educational opportunities to improve their overall awareness and ability to respond to matters of personal and public safety both on campus and off campus.

In the event that there is a situation on campus that presents a significant emergency or a situation that presents an immediate threat to the health or safety of persons on campus, a message will be sent via NCC Alert. NCC Alert enables fast and efficient dissemination of critical information to members of the NCC community during major emergencies. It allows the College to simultaneously send alerts through text messaging, voice mail, and e-mail to numerous devices of those members of the community who have registered for these services.

All members of the College community are strongly urged to register to receive alerts when they log into the NCC Portal. Click on the NCC Alert icon located at the Launch Pad section of the Portal. If you have any questions about this, contact the Information Center at the Plaza Level of the Tower, 516-572-7501, or the Help Desk at 516-572-0629 or helpdesk@ncc.edu.

In the event that the report of a significant emergency or dangerous situation is received, Public Safety will respond to assess and evaluate the situation. If it is determined that there is a situation which poses a risk to the campus population, the appropriate outside agencies will be notified and the Director of Public Safety, or his designee, will, without delay, initiate the notification system through NCC ALERT. The notification will include the nature and location of the emergency, and provide appropriate directives to safeguard the health and safety of members of the campus community. The College is in the process of enhancing its existing public address (PA) system (located in the blue light phone system) to allow College officials to provide verbal emergency notifications and instructions over a campus-wide loudspeaker system. During an emergency, you may receive important instructions via this system. When you hear these messages, please listen carefully and follow the instructions. The Office of College Relations will disseminate information regarding the emergency to the larger community if necessary.

There are signs posted in campus buildings that describe the appropriate procedures to be followed in the event of an emergency.

The above systems are tested periodically. If the system is being tested, the message you receive will indicate that fact and that no action on your part is necessary.

Drills are also held to test the College’s ability to respond appropriately to major emergencies. Several drills have been conducted for staff members throughout the year. Response is evaluated on an on-going basis.

Remember, you can always report an emergency to these numbers:

Nassau Community College Public Safety Emergency contact number: 711 from a campus telephone. From a cell phone 516-572-7111.
Police Emergency: 911

Nassau Community College is committed to a proactive preventive approach in assuring the campus is free of alcohol and substance abuse. The College operates in compliance with the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 and the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments. To maintain an atmosphere conducive to fulfilling this mission, the policy for a Drug-Free Campus states:

“The College expressly prohibits the unlawful use, possession, manufacture, distribution or dispensation of controlled substances, which includes alcohol, in all Nassau Community College facilities or while attending or conducting College business off campus.”

No alcohol is permitted on campus without the expressed permission of the President or his designee. Consumption of alcohol is not permitted on campus by anyone under the age of 21.

Compliance with the provisions of the College’s drug and alcohol policies is a condition of attendance at the College. Violations of any rule of the Student Code of Conduct shall result in appropriate disciplinary action.

The full text of the Student Code of Conduct is available in the College Catalog.

The possession or use of firearms of any nature, dangerous weapons, fireworks or explosives on campus is strictly prohibited.

Federal Law requires that all colleges and universities receiving federal funding report on specific types of crimes and incidents occurring on their campuses, or other locations under the control of the institution. Below are the definitions of reportable crimes as defined by and excerpted from the National Incident-Based Reporting System Edition of the Uniform Crime Reporting Handbook. (For further information on the Clery Act and for links to the U.S. Department of Education’s Crime statistics go to www.Clerycenter.org and follow the links). These are the definitions that we are required to report under.

Arson
Any willful or malicious burning or attempt to burn, with or without intent to defraud, a dwelling house, public building, motor vehicle or aircraft, or personal property of another, etc.

Homicide/Murder Criminal Homicide-Manslaughter by Negligence
The killing of another person through gross negligence.

Criminal Homicide-Murder and Non-negligent Manslaughter
The willful (nonnegligent) killing of one human being by another.

Robbery
The taking or attempting to take anything of value from the care, custody, or control of a person or persons by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear.

Aggravated Assault
An unlawful attack by one person upon another for the purpose of inflicting severe or aggravated bodily injury. This type of assault usually is accompanied by the use of a weapon or by means likely to produce death or great bodily harm. (It is not necessary that injury result from an aggravated assault when a gun, knife, or other weapon is used which could and probably would result in serious personal injury if the crime were successfully completed.)

Burglary
The unlawful entry of a structure to commit a felony or theft. For reporting purposes this definition includes: unlawful entry with intent to commit a larceny or felony; breaking and entering with intent to commit a larceny; housebreaking; safecracking; and all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned.

Motor Vehicle Theft

The theft or attempted theft of a motor vehicle. (Classify as motor vehicle theft all cases where automobiles are taken by persons not having lawful access even though the vehicles are later abandoned--including joyriding.)

Weapon Law Violations
The violation of laws or ordinances prohibiting the manufacture, sale, purchase, transportation, possession, concealment, or use of firearms, cutting instruments, explosives, incendiary devices, or other deadly weapons.

Drug Abuse Violations
The violation of laws prohibiting the production, distribution, and/or use of certain controlled substances and the equipment or devices utilized in their preparation and/or use. The unlawful cultivation, manufacture, distribution, sale, purchase, use, possession, transportation, or importation of any controlled drug or narcotic substance. Arrests for violations of State and local laws, specifically those relating to the unlawful possession, sale, use, growing, manufacturing, and making of narcotic drugs.

Liquor Law Violations
The violations of State or local laws or ordinances prohibiting the manufacture, sale, purchase, transportation, possession, or use of alcoholic beverages, not including the driving under the influence and drunkenness.

Sex Offenses.
A sex offense is any sexual act directed against another person, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent. The Violence Against Women Act and its proposed regulations require the inclusion of certain New York State definitions in a campus’s Annual Security Report and also require that those definitions be provided in campaigns, orientations, programs and trainings for employees and students. Definitions required include: consent; dating violence; domestic violence; sexual assault; and stalking.

Consent.

Sex offenses; lack of consent.

    1.  Whether  or  not  specifically  stated,  it is an element of every offense defined in this article  that  the  sexual  act  was  committed without consent of the victim.

    2. Lack of consent results from:

    (a) Forcible compulsion; or

    (b) Incapacity to consent; or

    (c)  Where  the  offense charged is sexual abuse or forcible touching,

  any circumstances, in addition to forcible compulsion or  incapacity  to

  consent,  in  which the victim does not expressly or impliedly acquiesce

  in the actor's conduct; or

    (d) Where the offense charged is rape in the third degree  as  defined

  in  subdivision  three  of section 130.25, or criminal sexual act in the

  third degree as defined in  subdivision  three  of  section  130.40,  in

  addition  to forcible compulsion, circumstances under which, at the time

  of the act of intercourse, oral sexual conduct or anal  sexual  conduct,

  the victim clearly expressed that he or she did not consent to engage in

  such  act,  and  a reasonable person in the actor's situation would have

  understood such person's words and acts as  an  expression  of  lack  of

  consent to such act under all the circumstances.

    3. A person is deemed incapable of consent when he or she is:

    (a) less than seventeen years old; or

    (b) mentally disabled; or

    (c) mentally incapacitated; or

    (d) physically helpless; or…. (Penal Law § 130.05)

 

Affirmative consent to sexual activity.

1. Every institution shall adopt the following definition of affirmative consent as  part  of its  code  of conduct: "Affirmative consent is a knowing, voluntary, and mutual decision among all participants to  engage  in  sexual  activity. Consent  can  be  given  by  words or actions, as long as those words or actions create clear permission regarding willingness to engage  in  the sexual  activity.  Silence or lack of resistance, in and of itself, does not demonstrate consent. The definition of consent does not  vary  based upon a participant's sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression."

2.  Each  institution's  code  of  conduct shall reflect the following principles as guidance for the institution's community:

a. Consent to any sexual  act  or  prior  consensual  sexual  activity   between or with any party does not necessarily constitute consent to any  other sexual act.

b. Consent is required regardless of whether the person initiating the act is under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol.

c. Consent may be initially given but withdrawn at any time.

d.  Consent  cannot  be  given  when  a person is incapacitated, which occurs when an individual lacks  the  ability  to  knowingly  choose  to participate in sexual activity. Incapacitation may be caused by the lack of  consciousness or being asleep, being involuntarily restrained, or if an individual otherwise cannot  consent.  Depending  on  the  degree  of  intoxication,  someone  who is under the influence of alcohol, drugs, or  other intoxicants may be incapacitated and therefore unable to consent.   

e. Consent cannot be given when it is  the  result  of  any  coercion,  intimidation, force, or threat of harm.

f.  When  consent  is  withdrawn  or  can  no  longer be given, sexual  activity must stop. (Education Law § 6441) 

Consent, abbreviated:
A clear, unambiguous, and voluntary agreement between the parties participating to engage in specific sexual activity. 

Dating violence:
New York State does not specifically define “dating violence.” However, under New York Law, intimate relationships are covered by the definition of domestic violence when the act constitutes a crime listed elsewhere in this document and is committed by a person in an “intimate relationship” with the victim. See “Family or Household Member” for definition of “intimate relationship.”

Domestic violence:
An act which would constitute a violation of the penal law, including, but not limited to acts constituting disorderly conduct, harassment, aggravated harassment, sexual misconduct, forcible touching, sexual abuse, stalking, criminal mischief, menacing, reckless endangerment, kidnapping, assault, attempted murder, criminal obstruction or breaching or blood circulation, or strangulation; and such acts have created a substantial risk of physical or emotional harm to a person or a person’s child. Such acts are alleged to have been committed by a family member. The victim can be anyone over the age of sixteen, any married person or any parent accompanied by his or her minor child or children in situations in which such person or such person’s child is a victim of the act. 

Family or household member:
Person’s related by consanguinity or affinity; Persons legally married to one another; Person formerly married to one another regardless of whether they still reside in the same household; Persons who have a child in common regardless of whether such persons are married or have lived together at any time; Unrelated persons who are continually or at regular intervals living in the same household or who have in the past continually or at regular intervals lived in the same household; Persons who are not related by consanguinity or affinity and who are or have been in an intimate relationship regardless of whether such persons have lived together at any time. Factors that may be considered in determining whether a relationship is an “intimate relationship” include, but are not limited to: the nature or type of relationship regardless of whether the relationship is sexual in nature; the frequency of interaction between the persons; and the duration of the relationship. Neither a casual acquaintance nor ordinary fraternization between two individuals in business or social contexts shall be deemed to constitute an “intimate relationship”; Any other category of individuals deemed to be a victim of domestic violence as defined by the office of children and family services in regulation. Intimate relationship status shall be applied to teens, lesbian/gay/bisexual/transgender, and elderly individuals, current and formerly married and/or dating heterosexual individuals who were, or are in an intimate relationship.

Parent:
means natural or adoptive parent or any individual lawfully charged with a minor child’s care or custody.

Sexual Assault:
New York State does not specifically define sexual assault. However, according to the Federal Regulations, sexual assault includes offenses that meet the definitions of rape, fondling, incest, or statutory rape as used in the FBI’s UCR program. 

Acts of sexual misconduct (As defined by New York Laws):
When a person (1) engages in sexual intercourse with another person without such person’s consent; or (2) engages in oral sexual conduct or anal sexual conduct without such person’s consent; or (3) engages in sexual conduct with an animal or a dead human body.  (Penal Law § 130.20)

Rape in the third degree:
When a person (1) engages in sexual intercourse with another person who is incapable of consent by reason of some factor other than being less than 17 years old; (2) Being 21 years old or more, engages in sexual intercourse with another person less than 17 years old; or (3) engages in sexual intercourse with another person without such person's consent where such lack of consent is by reason of some factor other than incapacity to consent. (Penal Law § 130.25)

Rape in the second degree:
When a person (1) being 18 years old or more, engages in sexual intercourse with another person less than 15 years old; or (2) engages in sexual intercourse with another person who is incapable of consent by reason of being mentally disabled or mentally incapacitated. It is an affirmative defense to the crime of rape in the second degree the defendant was less than four years older than the victim at the time of the act. (Penal Law § 130.30)

Rape in the first degree:
When a person engages in sexual intercourse with another person (1) by forcible compulsion; or (2) Who is incapable of consent by reason of being physically helpless; or (3) who is less than 11 years old; or (4) who is less than 13 years old and the actor is 18 years old or more. (Penal Law § 130.35)

Criminal sexual act in the third degree:
When a person engages in oral or anal sexual conduct (1) with a person who is incapable of consent by reason of some factor other than being less than 17 years old; (2) being 21 years old or more, with a person less than 17 years old; (3) with another person without such persons consent where such lack of consent is by reason of some factor other than incapacity to consent. (Penal Law § 130.40) 

Criminal sexual act in the second degree:
When a person engages in oral or anal sexual conduct with another person (1) and is 18 years or more and the other person is less than 15 years old; or (2) who is incapable of consent by reason of being mentally disabled or mentally incapacitated. It is an affirmative defense that the defendant was less than four years older than the victim at the time of the act. (Penal Law § 130.45)

Criminal sexual act in the first degree:
When a person engages in oral or anal sexual conduct with another person (1) by forcible compulsion; (2) who is incapable of consent by reason of being physically helpless; (3) who is less than 11 years old; or (4) who is less than 13 years old and the actor is 18 years old or more. (Penal Law § 130.50)

Forcible touching:
When a person intentionally, and for no legitimate purpose, forcibly touches the sexual or other intimate parts of another person for the purpose of degrading or abusing such person; or for the purpose of gratifying the actor’s sexual desire. It includes squeezing, grabbing, or pinching. (Penal Law § 130.52)

Persistent sexual abuse:
When a person commits a crime of forcible touching, or second or third degree sexual abuse within the previous ten year period, has been convicted two or more times, in separate criminal transactions for which a sentence was imposed on separate occasions of one of one of the above mentioned crimes or any offense defined in this article, of which the commission or attempted commissions thereof is a felony. (Penal Law § 130.53)

Sexual abuse in the third degree:
When a person subjects another person to sexual contact without the latter’s consent. For any prosecution under this section, it is an affirmative defense that (1) such other person’s lack of consent was due solely to incapacity to consent by reason of being less than 17 years old; and (2) such other person was more than 14 years old and (3) the defendant was less than five years older than such other person. (Penal Law § 130.55)

Sexual abuse in the second degree:
When a person subjects another person to sexual contact and when such other person is (1) incapable of consent by reason of some factor other than being less than 17 years old; or (2) less than 14 years old. (Penal Law § 130.60)

Sexual abuse in the first degree:
When a person subjects another person to sexual contact (1) by forcible compulsion; (2) when the other person is incapable of consent by reason of being physically helpless; or (3) when the other person is less than 11 years old; or (4) when the other person is less than 13 years old. (Penal Law § 130.65)

Aggravated sexual abuse:
For the purposes of this section, conduct performed for a valid medical purpose does not violate the provisions of this section. (Penal Law § 130.10 (2))

Aggravated sexual abuse in the fourth degree:
When a person inserts a (1) foreign object in the vagina, urethra, penis or rectum of another person and the other person is incapable of consent by reason of some factor other than being less than 17 years old; or (2) finger in the vagina, urethra, penis, rectum or anus of another person causing physical injury to such person and such person is incapable of consent by reason of some factor other than being less than 17 years old. (Penal Law § 130.65-A)

Aggravated sexual abuse in the third degree:
When a person inserts a foreign object in the vagina, urethra, penis, rectum or anus of another person (1)(a) by forcible compulsion; (b) when the other person is incapable of consent by reason of being physically helpless; or (c) when the other person is less than 11 years old; or (2) causing physical injury to such person and such person is incapable of consent by reason of being mentally disabled or mentally incapacitated. (Penal Law § 130.66)

Aggravated sexual abuse in the second degree:
When a person inserts a finger in the vagina, urethra, penis, rectum or anus of another person causing physical injury to such person by (1) forcible compulsion; or (2) when the other person is incapable of consent by reason of being physically helpless; or (3) when the other person is less than 11 years old. (Penal Law § 130.67)

Aggravated sexual abuse in the first degree:
When a person subjects another person to sexual contact: (1) By forcible compulsion; or (2) when the other person is incapable of consent by reason of being physically helpless; or (3) when the other person is less than eleven years old; or (4) when the other person is less than thirteen years old and the actor is twenty-one years old or older. (Penal Law § 130.70)

Course of sexual conduct against a child in the second degree:
When over a period of time, not less than three months, a person: (1) Engages in two or more acts of sexual conduct with a child less than 11 years old; or (2) being 18 years old or more engages in two or more acts of sexual conduct with a child less than 13 years old. A person may not be subsequently prosecuted for any other sexual offense involving the same victim unless the other charges offense occurred outside of the time period charged under this section. (Penal Law § 130.80)

Course of sexual conduct against a child in the first degree:
When a person over a period of time, not less than three months in duration, a person: (1) Engages in two or more acts of sexual conduct, or aggravated sexual contact with a child less than 11 years old; or (2) being 18 years old or more engages in two or more acts of sexual conduct which includes at least one act of sexual intercourse, oral sexual conduct, anal sexual conduct, or aggravated sexual contact with a child less than 13 years old. (Penal Law § 130.75)

Facilitating a sex offense with a controlled substance:
A person is guilty of facilitating a sex offense with a controlled substance when he or she: (1) knowingly and unlawfully possesses a controlled substance or any preparation, compound, mixture or substance that requires a prescription to obtain and administers such substance or preparation, compound, mixture or substance that requires a prescription to obtain to another person without such person’s consent and with intent to commit against such person conduct constituting a felony defined in this article; and (2) commits or attempts to commit such conduct constituting a felony defined in this article. (Penal Law § 130.90)

Incest in the third degree:
A person is guilty of incest in the third degree when he or she marries or engages in sexual intercourse, oral sexual conduct or anal sexual conduct with a person whom he or she knows to be related to him or her, whether through marriage or not, as an ancestor, descendant, brother or sister of either the whole or the half blood, uncle, aunt, nephew or niece. (Penal Law § 255.25)

Incest in the second degree:
A person is guilty of incest in the second degree when he or she commits the crime of rape in the second degree, or criminal sexual act in the second degree, against a person whom he or she knows to be related to him or her, whether through marriage or not, as an ancestor, descendant, brother or sister of either the whole or the half blood, uncle, aunt, nephew or niece. (Penal Law § 255.26)

Incest in the first degree:
A person is guilty of incest in the first degree when he or she commits the crime of rape in the first degree, or criminal sexual act in the first degree, against a person whom he or she knows to be related to him or her, whether through marriage or not, as an ancestor, descendant, brother or sister of either the whole or half blood, uncle, aunt, nephew or niece. (Penal Law § 255.27)

Stalking in the fourth degree:
When a person intentionally, and for not legitimate purpose, engages in a course of conduct directed at a specific person, and knows or reasonably should know that such conduct (1) is likely to cause reasonable fear of material harm to the physical health, safety or property of such person, a member of such person’s immediate family or a third party with whom such person is acquainted; or (2) causes material harm to the mental or emotional health of such person, where such conduct consists of following, telephoning or initiating communication or contact with such person, a member of such person’s immediate family or a third party with whom such person is acquainted, and the actor was previously clearly informed to cease that conduct; or (3) is likely to cause such person to reasonably fear that his or her employment, business or career is threatened, where such conduct consists of appearing, telephoning or initiating communication or contact at such person’s place of employment or business, and the actor was previously clearly informed to cease that conduct. (Penal Law § 120.45)

Stalking in the third degree:
When a person (1) Commits the crime of stalking in the fourth degree against any person in three or more separate transactions, for which the actor has not been previously convicted; or (2) commits the crime of stalking in the fourth degree against any person, and has previously been convicted, within the preceding ten years of a specified predicate crime and the victim of such specified predicate crime is the victim, or an immediate family member of the victim, of the present offense; or (3) with an intent to harass, annoy or alarm a specific person, intentionally engages in a course of conduct directed at such person which is likely to cause such person to reasonably fear physical injury or serious physical injury, the commission of a sex offense against, or the kidnapping, unlawful imprisonment or death of such person or a member of such person’s immediate family; or (4) commits the crime or stalking in the fourth degree and has previously been convicted within the preceding ten years of stalking in the fourth degree. (Penal Law § 120.50)

Stalking in the second degree:
When a person: (1) Commits the crime of stalking in the third degree and in the course of and furtherance of the commission of such offense: (a) displays, or possesses and threatens the use of, a firearm, pistol, revolver, rifle, sword, billy, blackjack, bludgeon, plastic knuckles, metal knuckles, chuka stick, sand bag, sandclub, sligshot, slungshot, shirken, “Kung Fu Star,” dagger, dangerous knife, dirk, razor, stiletto, imitation pistol, dangerous instrument, deadly instrument or deadly weapons; or (b) displays what appears to be a pistol, revolver, rifle, shotgun, machine gun or other firearm; or (2) commits the crime of stalking in the third against any person, and has previously been convicted, within the preceding five years, of a specified predicate crime, and the victim of such specified predicate crime is the victim, or an immediate family member of the victim, of the present offense; or (3) commits the crime of stalking in the fourth degree and has previously been convicted of stalking in the third degree; or (4) being 21 years of age or older, repeatedly follows a person under the age of fourteen or engages in a course of conduct or repeatedly commits acts over a period of time intentionally placing or attempting to place such person who is under the age of fourteen in reasonable fear of physical injury, serious physical injury or death; or (5) commits the crime of stalking in the third degree, against ten or more persons, in ten or more separate transactions, for which the actor has not been previously convicted. (Penal Law § 120.55)

Stalking in the first degree:
When a person commits the crime of stalking in the third degree or stalking in the second degree and, in the course and furtherance thereof, he or she intentionally or recklessly causes physical injury to the victim of such crime. (Penal Law § 120.60)

Hate crimes
This category includes all of the above listed Clery Offenses, but the motivation for the offense was based on the victim’s race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity, national origin, gender identity, or disability. In addition to the above offenses, the following offenses are also reportable under hate crimes:

Larceny
The unlawful taking, carrying, leading, or riding away of property from the possession or constructive possession of another. Attempted larcenies are included. Embezzlement, confidence games, forgery, worthless checks, etc., are excluded.

Simple assault
The unlawful physical attack by one person upon another where neither the offender displays a weapon, nor the victim suffers obvious severe or aggravated bodily injury involving apparent broken bones, loss of teeth, possible internal injury, severe laceration, or loss of consciousness.

Intimidation
To unlawfully place another person in reasonable fear of bodily harm through the use of threatening words and/or other conduct, but without displaying a weapon or subjecting the victim to actual physical attack.

Destruction/Damage/Vandalism of property
To willfully or maliciously destroy, damage, deface or otherwise injure real or personal property without the consent of the owner or the person having custody or control of it.

If you are the victim of a sexual assault or rape, go to a safe place and call for help. Call Public Safety, the police, a family member or a friend. It is imperative that you seek medical treatment immediately, not just for injuries incurred during the assault, but also to facilitate treatment against sexually transmitted diseases and pregnancy.

  • Do not change your clothing, wash or even comb your hair. Vital evidence can be lost. Leave the scene of the incident exactly as it is. Don’t clean the area or throw anything away.
  • As soon as possible, you should try to write down every detail of the incident. Again, this will facilitate the investigation of the incident.

Below are the offices and telephone numbers of on-campus resources, which can provide information and support in the event of any such assault.

Public Safety Emergency Number: 516-572-7111
Public Safety non-emergency phone number: 516-572-7100
Health Office: 516-572-7123
Student Personnel Services Psychological Counseling: 516-572-7698

Title IX Coordinator; Equity, Inclusion, and Affirmative Action, ADA/504 Office, Tower 8th Floor, Room 818: 516-572-7121

In instances when a Nassau Community College student reports to a counselor or pastoral representative that they have been the victim of a crime, the counselor/representative will inform the student that he/she has the right to report said incident to Public Safety and/or to the local authorities, including but not limited to the Police.

The student is advised that this disclosure is voluntary and if desired, confidential. If requested, the student will receive assistance with notifying authorities by College personnel. Whether or not the student chooses to report said incident, psychological counseling services will be offered and/or appropriate referrals to community agencies will be made as needed.

All counselors participate in multiple professional development activities during the course of each academic year. The counseling department ensures that the College is in compliance with all federal and state mandates, plus an annual review of the day-to-day operations are done.

Student Bill Of Rights Link Here

Public Safety Emergency Number: 516-572-7111; from a college phone dial 711.
Public Safety non-emergency phone number: 516-572-7100
Health Office: 516-572-7123
Student Personnel Services Psychological Counseling: 516-572-7698

Title IX Coordinator; Equity, Inclusion, and Affirmative Action, ADA/504 Office, Tower 8th Floor, Room 818: 516-572-7121

  • If this is an emergency call 911.
  • Response-A 24-hour crisis information hotline: 516-679-1111
  • Nassau Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Rape 516-542-0404
  • The Safe Center LI 516-542-0404 http://thesafecenterli.org/about-the-safe-center-li/history/
  • Sexual Assault, rape, child abuse 24/7 hotline: 516-222-2293
  • Project Salva 24/7 bi-lingual domestic violence hotline 516-889-2849
  • Sex Crime Squad of the Nassau County Police Department: 516-573-8055
  • Sex Offense and Domestic Violence Bureau of the Nassau County District Attorney's Office: 516-571-1266
  • The Retreat: 631-329-2200; http://theretreatinc.org
  • In New York City, call 1-800-621-HOPE (4673) or dial 311
  • NYS Office for the Prevention of Domestic Violence (in several languages) www.opdv.ny.gov/help/index.html
  • GLBTQ Domestic Violence Project: www.glbtqdvp.org
  • The Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network: www.rainn.org/get-help

The New York State Sex Offender Registry may be accessed from any computer with an internet link at http:/criminaljustice.state.ny.us/nsor/index.htm

WHERE TO REPORT CRIMES Any criminal activity should be reported to any of the following offices:

Public Safety 516-572-7100
Dean of Students Office 516-572-7376
Public Safety Emergency number 711 (from a campus phone); 516-572-7111 (from a non-campus phone) Nassau County Policy Department Emergency: 911
Nassau County Police Department Third Precinct 516-573-6300

For the purpose of gathering crime statistics for this publication, incidents reported to the Dean of Students and the Office of Affirmative Action are passed onto Public Safety for inclusion. Incidents reported to counselors are forwarded to Public Safety for statistical purposes only, and are not investigated.

Submitted to the Academic Senate at the May 13, 2014 meeting; Approved by the College Board of Trustees, September 15, 2014.

Click to view Policy

In January 2014, Nassau Community College, through a highly competitive process, was awarded a three year $300,000 grant by the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office on Violence Against Women. The grant has been used to fund a coordinated approach that is intended to combat violence against women by building upon the current strengths of NCC’s Public Safety Department, other campus departments, and community organizations in partnership with a highly experienced social service agency – The Retreat. The grant to NCC set forth five project goals that are being addressed by 35 discrete activities. Included among these goals are establishing and reinforcing an understanding of the variety of behaviors that are encompassed by the phrases “domestic violence,” “dating violence,” “stalking,” and “sexual assault;” creating a coordinated community response to violence against women in the area served by the grant; establishing a mandatory prevention and education program for all incoming students; and training all members of the NCC campus disciplinary/conduct board to respond effectively to allegations of domestic violence. The programs that we have established engage and educate students, instructors, administrators, campus safety personnel and the Athletic Department. Dr. Donna Bacon, who is currently an instructor at NCC and brings with her 18 years of experience working with Domestic Violence, is the “Project’s Director.” The film “Not Anymore” for community colleges has been introduced for Faculty, Staff, and students on these issues.

Throughout the year, the Nassau Community College Public Safety Department offers to the College Community the S.H.A.R.P. Program (Sexual Harassment and Rape Prevention Training); Public Safety recently increased its contingent of instructors. Interested parties should contact Lieutenant Keith Blum at 516-572-7801 to schedule a class. The Public Safety Department has several officers certified as instructors in R.A.D. Training (Rape Aggression Defense) began offering this training course in the Fall of 2015. This class has been offered periodically throughout the year. Interested parties should contact the instructors at publicsafetyrad@ncc.edu.

During the course of the academic year, many programs are offered to teach the College community how to recognize crime, prevent crime victimization, and how to generally enhance personal safety and well-being. There are several very active campus committees charged with these educational programs such as the Campus Safety Advisory Committee, and the Sexual Harassment Education Committee. Both of these groups as well as the Women’s Center are active in providing the College population with valuable information pertaining to safety issues.

CAMPUS PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICE
Located on the east side of West Lot 5

From an on-campus college phone for EMERGENCY- DIAL 711
From a cell phone on campus for EMERGENCY – DIAL 516-572-7111
From an on-campus college phone for NON-EMERGENCY HELP DIAL 2-7100
From a cell phone on campus for NON-EMERGENCY HELP DIAL 516-572-7100

MISSING STUDENT POROCEDURE

If a family member is concerned about a student’s well-being, we will attempt to deliver a message to that effect. If a family member has filed a missing person complaint with a local police agency, we will cooperate with them to our fullest extent possible.

AUTO ASSISTANCE
Public Safety maintains phone numbers of local garages and towing services

HANDICAPPED RESERVED PARKING WITH PERMIT
Temporary 30-day permits for campus use only are available from the Public Safety Office

Nassau County Permits may be obtained from:
Nassau County Office of the Physically Challenged
60 Charles Lindbergh Boulevard
Uniondale, NY 11553
Phone: 516-227-7399

ID CARDS- Identification cards are produced in Student Services Center, for students, and in the Public Safety Office for faculty and staff.

VALID IDENTIFICATION MUST BE PRESENTED.

LOST AND FOUND- CAMPUS PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICE Turn in all articles to increase the possibility of return to owners

  • Reserved
  • Special Permit
  • Handicapped
  • Official

GENERAL
The use of roads and parking fields on the Nassau Community College Campus is governed by New York State Vehicle and Traffic Law, Nassau County Ordinances 372 and 482, and the rules and regulations of Nassau Community College.

College grounds are patrolled by both Nassau County Police and Campus Public Safety Officers. All persons using campus streets are required to obey speed limits, traffic signs, traffic control devices, parking regulations and the directions of Public Safety Officers in performance of their duties.

Violators of campus motor vehicle regulations are subject to summonses returnable to the Nassau County Traffic and Parking Violations Agency located at 16 Cooper Street West, Hempstead, New York (www.nassaucountyny.gov/agencies/TPVA/index.html). Illegally parked vehicles are subject to removal and impoundment at the owner’s expense. Moving violation convictions are entered onto the vehicle operator’s license.

If you have any questions concerning these regulations, contact Public Safety at extension 2-7100, or 516-572-7100 from a non-campus phone.

PARKING
All parking on campus is by permit only. Parking is permitted only in designated parking stalls. There is no parking or standing on any campus street. College drivers are also advised not to park on any area posted as military streets or property under penalty of a County summons. The standard fine for unauthorized parking is $80.00. There is a $10.00 N.Y.S. mandatory surcharge applicable to all summonses in addition to the original fine, as well as a $45.00 Nassau County administrative fee.

RESERVED PARKING- HANDICAPPED
Areas designated for Handicapped are for Handicapped only, and a County or State Handicapped permit must be properly displayed and visible in the vehicle. Applications for Handicapped parking permits may be obtained from the Office of the Physically Challenged, 60 Charles Lindbergh Boulevard, Uniondale, NY. The fine for unauthorized parking in an area designated for Handicapped parking is at least $265.00 Handicapped permits are not valid in stalls designated for Special Permits.

RESERVED PARKING-FACULTY AND STAFF
Specially marked areas reserved for members of the College Faculty and Staff are designated. This reserved status is in effect in all designated areas designated as Faculty and Staff by permit 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The Faculty and Staff parking permits are available at the Public Safety Office. All Faculty and Staff members are responsible for the proper displaying of these permits. They are to be placed on the windshield of the vehicle, behind the rearview mirror, low enough so as not to be obscured by heavy tints. ONLY ONE PERMIT WILL BE ISSUED. Report the loss of any permit to Public Safety immediately.

CAMPUS SPEED LIMIT
The speed limit for the campus in its entirety is 25 miles per hour. For your own safety and the safety of others, please adhere to this limit.

OFFICIAL PARKING
Areas designated as Official are for use of Federal, State and County vehicles only.

SPECIAL PERMIT PARKING
Special permit spaces are not for the general use of Faculty and Staff members. A Special Parking Permit must be secured at the Public Safety Office to utilize these areas. These areas are designated for companies and people performing services for the college.

PUBLIC SAFETY PERMITS
These permits are the only permits authorizing parking on Education Drive. Other Special Permits and faculty and staff permits are not valid in that area and violators will be summonsed.

OTHER SPECIAL PERMITS
There are permits for use on Education Drive, Quarter’s Service Road, and East Road. Only vehicles with the appropriate parking permit are to be in these areas. All violators will be summonsed.

TEMPORARY PARKING PERMITS
All parking on campus is by permit only. Prior to a vehicle being parked in a restricted area, a temporary parking permit must be secured from the Public Safety Office when using a vehicle other than that equipped with a regular parking permit, or being used by a visitor.

STUDENT PARKING- VEHICLE IDENTIFICATION PROGRAM
All vehicles parked on the grounds of Nassau Community College must have a properly displayed vehicle identification decal. This decal is to be placed on the rear most driver’s side window of the vehicle. This decal may be used to park in lots on campus that do not require Faculty/Staff permits, handicap permits, special permits, etc. Vehicles parked on campus without a valid vehicle identification decal are subject to fine and/or tow away. They may be obtained on line at the following link: https://www.credentialsops.com/CGI-BIN/gacgiord.pgm?ALUMPP002873

The crimes included in this publication are based upon reports filed with Public Safety, the Dean of Students Office, and the Affirmative Action Office. Incidents reported to the Nassau County Police Department are also accounted for in the statistics provided.

The Campus Safety Act requires colleges to report hate crimes in this publication. For reporting purposes, a hate crime occurs when an individual is intentionally victimized because of his or her actual or perceived race, gender, religion, ethnicity, sexual orientation, or disability.

View The STATISTICS MANDATED BY THE CLERY ACT